Monthly Archives: July 2015

Creating Realm in OpenAM and Configuring OpenDJ as a Data Store

I’ve tried my level best to keep this post as complete in itself as possible to be able to go through without having to read/watch any of my earlier posts/video logs. So while it is not strictly required to read/watch my earlier posts/video logs on this blog to go through this one, at least to understand the infrastructure used, it’s desired that you take a look at a couple of my earlier posts on OpenAM and OpenDJ at the links below:

ForgeRock OpenDJ Installation In a Linux Container
ForgeRock OpenAM Installation In a Linux Container

Here’s what you can expect from the screen-cast below

– Creating new realm in OpenAM
– Understanding OpenAM realm based Authentication
– Configuring OpenDJ as a Data Store for the OpenAM realm

Enjoy!

Setting Up ForgeRock OpenIDM with MySQL

ForgeRock OpenIDM comes bundled with OrientDB. But the use of OrientDB as an internal repository for OpenIDM is not recommended in a production environment. A list of supported JDBC repositories for production use with OpenIDM can be found here. In this post, you’ll find a screen-cast that demonstrates the configuration of MySQL as an internal repository for OpenIDM. The following video log, however, does not demonstrate the installation of OpenIDM, but if interested you can watch the OpenIDM installation here.

The following screen-cast is based on the ForgeRock OpenIDM documentation section

ForgeRock OpenDJ Replication Across Linux Containers

I’ve already posted an entry on ForgeRock OpenDJ Installation in a Linux Container. If interested, you can read/watch it here. If you are already familiar with OpenDJ installation as a stand alone Directory Server instance and would like to know the very simple steps involved in setting up data replication, the following video log might be useful for you. The screen-cast below uses two OpenDJ instances running on two different Linux Containers to set up data replication. A great deal of information required for performing this demo was fetched from Ludo’s Sketches. ForgeRock Documentation that talks of OpenDJ Data Replication can be found here.

Sit back, relax, watch & enjoy!

ForgeRock OpenIG Installation & Configuration in a Linux Container

ForgeRock has four main products: OpenDJ, OpenAM, OpenIDM and OpenIG. A few days back I embarked on a journey to publish posts on my blog that demonstrated basic functionality of each of the aforesaid products. This post, it’s safe to say, might be the one leading to the chequered flag. So here’s the story so far:

– ForgeRock OpenDJ Installation in a Linux Container
– ForgeRock OpenAM Installation in a Linux Container
– ForgeRock OpenIDM Installation in a Linux Container
– ForgeRock OpenIDM Integration with ForgeRock OpenDJ

and now to the last one in the series that demonstrates the functionality of OpenIG (Identity Gateway) at a very basic level of course. And as with the last blog entries, I present to you the video logs of OpenIG installation and configuration. The demonstration in the video is based on ForgeRock OpenIG Quick Start documentation.

What you get to see in the video log is:

– Creation of a new Linux Container ‘my-openig’
– Installation of Jetty
– Deployment of OpenIG in Jetty
– Installation of minimal http server
– Configuring the OpenIG to redirect requests to the minimal http server

Enjoy!

ForgeRock OpenIDM Integration with ForgeRock OpenDJ

This post picks up from an earlier one and maybe it makes sense to have look at that first before going through this one. So now that we have ForgeRock OpenIDM running inside a Linux Container, in the video log embedded below, we integrate it with ForgeRock OpenDJ. We’ll then use OpenIDM to provision users on to the OpenDJ. Here’s a summary of what you get to see in the video:

– A quick look at the existing installation of ForgeRock OpenIDM and ForgeRock OpenDJ
– Configuring OpenIDM with LDAP connector during startup using available sample files
– Reconciliation of identifies from ForgeRock OpenDJ to ForgeRock OpenIDM
– Provisioning users from ForgeRock OpenIDM to ForgeRock OpenDJ


More details are available at this section of the OpenIDM documentation

ForgeRock OpenIDM Installation In a Linux Container

Chronologically, this is my third blog update around ForgeRock software stack, the first two being Installation of OpenDJ in a Linux Container and ForgeRock OpenAM Installation in a LXC. While none of these entries have any dependency on each other whatsoever, it is recommended to watch it in order so as to get a fairly uncomplicated idea on the infrastructure being used for demonstrations. In the video logs embedded in all the blog posts as mentioned above, the ForgeRock products are being installed in Linux Containers in Ubuntu Linux flavour that in turn is running in a Virtual Box. Because I thought it maybe relatively effortless for you to sit back and enjoy watching a video rather than reading through a lengthy essay, I’m sticking to my idea of publishing my screen-cast on installation of ForgeRock OpenIDM in a Linux Container. In the screencast, you’ll find:

– Creating new linux container for installation of OpenIDM
– Installation of OpenIDM in a LXC
– Starting/stopping OpenIDM Services
– Accessing OpenIDM using REST calls
– Accessing OpenIDM using BUI
– Configuring OpenIDM as a run control script in Ubuntu Linux

With a hope that this screencast will give you a some understanding on getting started with ForgeRock OpenIDM, I here unto present it for you:


We will figure out how to use OpenIDM for Identity provisioning in a later segment, not too far in the future. In the mean time, if you would like to browse away the features of ForgeRock OpenIDM, its documentation can be found here.

ForgeRock OpenAM – Configuring Policies to Protect Web Applications

In an earlier post we saw the Installation and Configuration of ForgeRock OpenAM and how it protects a Web Based Application. The follow screen-cast, which is an extract from a live session conducted for a ForgeRock Customer takes us through the Policy Configuration in OpenAM so that the Web Application displayes a particular page only to those Users who belong to an OpenDJ group called ‘Employees’:

Enjoy!

ForgeRock OpenAM Installation in a Linux Container

In continuation to my earlier blog on Installing ForgeRock’s OpenDJ in a Linux Container, and to keep up with the promise of doing my bit to introduce ForgeRock’s software stack, I present here another set of video logs that takes you through the deployment of ForgeRock’s Access Management Solution:

– Installation of Apache Web Server in a Linux Container [Video 00]
– Installation of Apache Tomcat Application a Linux Container [Video 01]
– Deploying ForgeRock OpenAM in a Tomcat Application Server [Video 02]
– Protecting Apache Web Server using ForgeRock OpenAM [Video 03]

[Video 00]


[Video 01]


[Video 02]


[Video 03]

ForgeRock OpenDJ Installation in a Linux Container

So after I bid farewell to over a decade long teaching profession, I’ve now joined the band @ ForgeRock. Feels at home, as I now find myself amongst some familiar folks, doing activities on popular open source products on Identity Management that has always been so dear to me.

Without any further ado, let me do my bit to introduce the ForgeRock products to you. To start with, I’ll help you setup ForgeRock’s directory service solution ‘OpenDJ’. Because I’ve a plan to show you the entire ForgeRock product portfolio over the next few weeks, I’ve setup the OpenDJ component in an OS virtualization solution. I’ve my own OS preferences, but for the sake of demonstration, I’ve decided to use the freely available Ubuntu OS. And in Ubuntu, we will create Linux Containers (a.k.a LXC), light weight OS virtualization solution. Over the next few weeks, we’ll have one container for each of the ForgeRock product.

Rather than writing a lengthy essay on the steps to create/configure Linux containers (LXC) and then install/configure ForgeRock’s OpenDJ, I’ve decided to publish my video logs here, which I think might turn out to be more convenient for you sit back and watch.

So here’s what I’ve done:
– Installed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on a VirtualBox. [Video 00]
– Performed Package updates post installation.[Video 01]
– Installed the packages required for creating LXC.[Video 01]
– Installed the LXC Web Console package (to access LXC using BUI). [Video 01]
– Upgraded the host OS from 14.04 to 14.10 [not shown in the video]
– Cloned the LXC to create a new Linux Container for installing ForgeRock’s OpenDJ. [Video 02]
– Downloaded the OpenDJ software. [Video 02]
– Installed / Configured OpenDJ in a Linux Container [Video 02]

In case you are familiar with the Linux and Linux Container installation, feel free to skip the video 00 and video 01. Please also note that video recording was paused during the lengthy package installation procedure, which otherwise would have put you to sleep.

Video 00

Video 01

Video 02

For a detailed introduction on OpenDJ, watch this video